Monthly Archives: June 2013

Bad Day for Ignorance

Sorry, ignorant Charlie. Your days are numbered.

This week has been huge for turning so-called progressive issues into mainstream ones, and for banishing ignorance to history, where it belongs. And it’s only Wednesday.

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Usually society crawls into change, but sometimes it leaps into a new ocean.

Today the Supreme Court settled two issues in favor of gay marriage, and the momentum on this issue has shifted. Youthful people are able to see marriage in terms of civil rights, much in the way that earlier generations saw racial equality as a civil right. Both issues require a shift of perspective to envision the world in a new way.

Yesterday, President Obama delivered his most in-depth speech on climate change. This issues also demands a shift of perspective to recognize the civil rights of children to grow up in a healthy world. This speech was not as ground-breaking as the Supreme Court decision, but hopefully it marks a turning point. The president said that he has no patience for people who deny that climate change is real. That debate is long over. We need to move, to progress towards action.

Today the Supremes showed us how it’s done. Decisively.

Don’t eat that blue crab!

Today the “watchdogs of seafood” at Seafood Watch have released their newest recommendations, and they discourage you from getting crabs from China—and don’t eat them either. They stamped the red Avoid sticker on both blue and red swimmer crabs from China, India, Indonesia, Thailand, or Vietnam.

Seafood guides help consumers make smart choices.

What’s wrong with them? Besides coming from the other side of the world and having a huge transportation footprint, they are likely harvested by bottom trawling, a method similar to clear-cutting a forest. Everything gets destroyed. Plus, most of the world’s endangered crabs are from Asia, so in general crabs are more troubled there than elsewhere.

Instead, eat clams from anywhere in the world: they have been upgraded to green light status of Best Choice.

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The Atlantic blue crab should not be confused with the Pacific blue swimmer crab.

But what about my lovely blue crabs from the Gulf of Mexico? Those are a completely different species, Callinectes sapidus, and they earn the yellow recommendation of Good Alternative, although the blue crabs from Chesapeake Bay rank as a Best Choice. Depending on where you live, you can eat a little or a lot. Crab-heads can get the full scoop from an in-depth 2012 Seafood Watch report. Seafood Watch is owned and operated by the Monterey Bay Aquarium Foundation.

The question gets complicated when you order a crab cake. Was it made from Chesapeake Bay or Chinese crabs? A good restaurant will tell you, as will a good grocery store. Conscientious consumers find out.

The best option in all cases is to catch the crabs yourself—the aquatic variety, please. The second best option is to follow the logic of the farmer’s market and find a “fisher’s market” that offers locally caught crabs. These fishers must follow the local regulations; for example, in Florida, blue crab females with eggs cannot be harvested.

In other changes to Seafood Watch’s list, they are feeling good about North America’s Pacific sardines. For squid, they have followed the crab’s example: avoid squid from Asia, and choose American varieties.

On Seafood Watch, every item from China is categorized as Avoid except one: tilapia. As the world’s largest producer of tilapia, China earns a yellow Good Alternative, whereas the U.S. version is green-lighted as a Best Choice.

China is not the only bad guy when it comes to unsustainable seafood, but they are the biggest player, especially in terms of aquaculture or farm-raised seafood. Our stores are stocked with their products, but none of them are Best Choices. Read your labels, because you can do better and feel better than simply buying the easiest and cheapest product. Not only do you get what you pay for, you pay for where you get it from.